Cadbury Schweppes

Cadbury Schweppes
Item# 4626
$39.00

In 1824, John Cadbury began selling tea, coffee, and drinking chocolate, which he produced himself, at Bull Street in Birmingham, England. He later moved into the production of a variety of cocoa and drinking chocolates, made in a factory in Bridge Street and sold mainly to the wealthy because of the high cost of production. John Cadbury became a partner with his brother Benjamin and the company they formed was called 'Cadbury Brothers of Birmingham'.

The brothers opened an office in London and in 1854 they received the Royal Warrant as manufacturers of chocolate and cocoa to Queen Victoria. In the 1850s the industry received a much needed boost, with the reduction in the high import taxes on cocoa, allowing chocolate to be more affordable to everybody.

Due to the popularity of a new expanded product line, including the "Cadbury's Cocoa Essence", the company decided to cease trading in tea in 1873. Master confectioner Frederic Kinchelman was appointed to share his recipe and production secrets with Cadbury, which led to an assortment of chocolate covered products.

Taking over the business in 1861, John Cadbury's sons Richard and George decided in 1878 that they needed new premises. Better transport access for milk that was inward shipped by canal, and cocoa that was brought in by rail from London, Southampton and Liverpool docks was taken into consideration. With the development of the Birmingham West Suburban Railway along the path of the Worcester and Birmingham Canal, they acquired the Bournbrook estate, comprising 14.5 acres of countryside 5 miles south of the outskirts of Birmingham. Located next Stirchley Road railway station, which itself was opposite the canal, they renamed the estate Bournville and opened the Bournville factory the following year.

In 1893, George Cadbury bought 120 acres of land close to the works and planned, at his own expense, a model village which would 'alleviate the evils of modern more cramped living conditions'. By 1900 the estate included 313 cottages and houses set on 330 acres of land. As the Cadbury family were Quakers there were no pubs in the estate; in fact, it was their Quaker beliefs that first led them to sell tea, coffee and cocoa as alternatives to alcohol.

Cadbury merged with drinks company Schweppes to form Cadbury Schweppes in 1969. Cadbury Schweppes went on to acquire Sunkist, Canada Dry, Typhoo Tea and more. In the US, Schweppes Beverages was created and the manufacture of Cadbury confectionery brands was licensed to The Hershey Company.

Snapple, Mistic and Stewart's (formerly Cable Car Beverage) were sold by Triarc to Cadbury Schweppes in 2000 for $1.45 billion. In October of that same year, Cadbury Schweppes purchased Royal Crown from Triarc.

In March 2007, it was revealed that Cadbury Schweppes was planning to split its business into two separate entities: one focusing on its main chocolate and confectionery market; the other on its US drinks business. The demerger took effect on 2 May 2008, with the drinks business becoming Dr. Pepper Snapple Group Inc. In December 2008 it was announced that Cadbury was to sell its Australian beverage unit to Asahi Breweries.




Close Up of Vignette:




Certificate: American Depositary Receipt, issued on September 24, 2001

Printer: Northern Bank Note Company

Dimensions: 8” (h) x 12” (w)

State: UK-United Kingdom

Subject Matter: Food and Drink | Soda and Juices | Candy and Sweets

Vignette Topic(s): Distinguished Gentleman | Company Logo Featured

Condition: No fold lines or cancels, and some toning from age.





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